Spotify has announced the rollout of a new vertical feed that will give users the ability to preview podcasts and music through scrolling, similar to TikTok.

The feed – which is available now – was announced through the streaming platform’s official newsroom on Wednesday (March 8). The new interface makes previewing content on the platform easier for users and is split into two sections: music and podcasts & shows.

Both sections are available through “music” and “podcasts & shows” tabs at the top of users’ feeds. Upon clicking a desired feed, users will be fed personalised recommendations based on listening habits and machine learning. Users will be able to preview content through these feeds, which act similarly to TikTok through vertical scrolling. Users will also be able to save or download these recommendations into their own playlists with ease.

Spotify co-president and chief product & technology offer Gustav Söderström said of the new feature: “The world today pulls us in a million different directions. So the most important thing we, at Spotify, can do for creators is to reduce the distance between their art and the people who love it… or who would love it as soon as they discovered it.”

The streaming platform has also confirmed that user shortcuts including playlists and favourites will remain at the top of their Home feed and will not be removed or repositioned with the introduction of its new features.

Last month, Spotify launched an AI-powered DJ function for users in the United States and Canada, which learns users’ listening habits and plays their favourite songs. Spotify said of the DJ function at the time: “It will sort through the latest music and look back at some of your old favorites—maybe even resurfacing that song you haven’t listened to for years. It will then review what you might enjoy and deliver a stream of songs picked just for you. And what’s more, it constantly refreshes the lineup based on your feedback.”

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